Cochrane News

Get Social with Cochrane!

3 years 5 months ago

We aim to put Cochrane evidence at the heart of health decision-making all over the world. This not only means producing high-quality and relevant systematic reviews but making sure that our evidence is accessible and advocating for evidence. Join us on social media to learn more about the work we do, our community, and the health evidence we produce.

You can access Cochrane evidence and news on your favourite social media platform! Follow us on:

We love to engage with our Community and retweet or share to Instagram stories!   Be sure to tag a Cochrane social media account  so that we see the post. 

Share a picture of you enjoying Cochrane training, using the Cochrane Handbook, or share the latest Cochrane evidence. Your social media posts can earn you contribution points to work towards gaining full Cochrane Membership! Share, tag us, and add  your contribution to your free account. 

If you're interested in learning more about sharing on social media, check out these resources:

Thursday, June 23, 2022
Muriah Umoquit

Special Collection: Diagnosing Tuberculosis

3 years 5 months ago

Cochrane Library releases updated Special Collection on diagnosing tuberculosis

 World Tuberculosis Day is marked annually on 24 March as it commemorates the date in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch announced his discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacillus that causes tuberculosis.

This Special Collection, curated by Cochrane contributors, includes Cochrane Reviews from the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group and other systematic reviews from other international teams. It highlights how Cochrane evidence contributes within a wider landscape of tuberculosis evidence and guidelines. The Collection also describes key WHO guidelines on tuberculosis diagnostics, and their underpinning systematic reviews, some which are published within the WHO Guideline itself.

 

Wednesday, March 23, 2022
Muriah Umoquit

VIDEO: What are systematic reviews?

3 years 7 months ago

A systematic review attempts to identify, appraise and synthesize all the empirical evidence that meets pre-specified eligibility criteria to answer a specific research question. Researchers conducting systematic reviews use explicit, systematic methods that are selected with a view aimed at minimizing bias, to produce more reliable findings to inform decision making. 

Here is a video from Cochrane Consumers and Communication that explains what a systematic review is clearly and simply for people who may not be familiar with the concepts and terminology of systematic reviews: what they are, how researchers prepare them, and why they’re an important part of making informed decisions about health - for everyone. 

Cochrane evidence provides a powerful tool to enhance your healthcare knowledge and decision making. This video from Cochrane Sweden explains a bit about how we create health evidence, including systematic reviews, and other activities of Cochrane. 

Thursday, January 13, 2022
Anonymous

Cochrane Podcasts

5 years 6 months ago

 

It’s hard to stay up-to-date with the latest health evidence. Listen to leading experts and Cochrane review authors explain in plain language the evidence and findings of their high-impact reviews. In 5 minutes or less, healthcare professionals to patients and families can understand the latest trusted evidence to help make better informed decisions.

For 20 years, Cochrane has produced systematic reviews which are internationally recognized as the highest standard in evidence-based health care resources. Cochrane works collaboratively with contributors around the world to produce authoritative, relevant, and reliable evidence.

You can view and search our entire catalogue of hundreds of podcasts or subscribe via Apple Podcast, Google Podcasts, or Spotify for the latest updates.

Monday, March 7, 2022
Muriah Umoquit

Clinical Trials Day 2022

6 years 2 months ago

Clinical Trials Day is celebrated on 20 May marking the day in 1747 on which James Lind is believed to have begun the first known controlled trial, comparing different treatments for scurvy which was common among sailors in the British Royal Navy. (Watch a video explaining the trial to see history in the making.) 

Learn about Cochrane systematic reviews and how clinical trials are used:


Registering and reporting the results of clinical trials is an ethical, and often legal, responsibility. However, it is well documented that the results of many studies are never published.


Cochrane’s systematic reviews rely upon the results of clinical trials. To assess the effectiveness and safety of healthcare interventions, we need to know what trials were done, how they were conducted and what their findings were. Without access to detailed information from all clinical trials, we cannot have a full picture of the evidence.

Cochrane's  clinical trial transparency advocacy:  Cochrane Library systematic reviews of interest: 

 

Thursday, May 19, 2022
Muriah Umoquit

Updated review: Insufficient evidence for use of Omega-3 supplements in treating depression

6 years 9 months ago

Updated Cochrane research concludes that there is insufficient evidence for the use of Omega-3 fatty acid supplements in treating major depressive disorder.

Omega-3 fatty acids are widely thought to be essential for good health and are naturally found in fatty fish such as mackerel; other seafood; and some nuts and seeds.

Omega-3 fatty acids have been widely promoted globally for a variety of health concerns, and are readily available as an over-the-counter supplement. These supplements have hugely increased in popularity over the last decade, together with a range of other supplements including ginseng, garlic, green tea, vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

There have been various studies that have suggested a role for Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in treating major depressive disorder. Adults with major depressive disorders are characterized by depressed mood or a lack of pleasure in previously enjoyed activities for at least two weeks, in the absence of any physical cause, that impact on everyday life.

Figures published in 2018 estimated prevalence rates for major depressive disorders of 163 million cases in 2017, and global incidence rates of 242 million cases, resulting in 33 million years lived with disability globally, an increase of 12.6% since 2007.


This updated Cochrane Review, published recently in the Cochrane Library, gathered together data from 28 randomized trials involving a total of 1944 participants. The trials investigated the impact of giving an Omega-3 fatty acid supplement in a capsule form and compared it to a dummy pill. In one study, involving 40 participants, researchers also investigated the impact of the same supplementation compared to an anti-depressant treatment.

The Cochrane authors found that, whilst people who were given Omega-3 fatty acids reported lower symptom scores than people with the dummy pill, the effect was small and there were important limitations that undermined their confidence in the results. Their analyses showed that although similar numbers of people experienced side effects, more data would be required to understand the risks of taking Omega-3 fatty acids.



Lead author Katherine Appleton from Bournemouth University said, “This is an update of an existing Cochrane Review, using the same methods as we previously used, with some refinements. The update includes 8 randomised controlled trials published since 2015, in addition to the 20 trials included in the previous review.

Our conclusions however remain unchanged. We found a small-to-modest positive effect of Omega-3 fatty acids compared to placebo for depressive symptomology, but the size of this effect is unlikely to be meaningful to people with depression, and we considered the evidence on which this conclusion was based to be of low or very low quality. All studies contributing to our analyses were of direct relevance to our research question, but most of these studies are small and of low quality. We also found insufficient evidence to clearly determine the effects of omega-3 oils on negative side effects or when compared with anti-depressants.”

She added, “At present, we just don’t have enough high-quality evidence to determine the effects of Omega-3 fatty acids as a treatment for major depressive disorder. It’s important that people who suffer from depression are aware of this, so that they can make more informed choices about treatment.”

 

Tuesday, December 7, 2021
Nancy Owens
Checked
19 hours 33 minutes ago
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